West and Central Africa: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (22-28 November 2022)

CAMEROON

ESCALATING INSECRITY DISPLACES OVER 19,300 PEOPLE IN THE FAR NORTH

Several attacks by non-state armed groups (NSAGs) in November in the Mayo-Tsanaga and Logone et Chari divisions, in the far north, led to the displacement of over 19,300 people. Some of the internally displaced persons (IDPs) were hosted by local families, while others were sleeping outdoors. Traditional leaders allocated land to IDPs to build temporary shelters. The internally displaced critically need food, shelter, and drinking water. Prior to the attack, the Mayo-Tsanaga and Logone et Chari divisions were already hosting thousands of IDPs since April, including those displaced due to floods. The security situation is increasingly volatile due to recurrent armed attacks.

MALI

ARMED GROUPS ATTACKED A SITE FOR THE DISPLACED IN THE SOUTHEAST

On 21 November, armed groups attacked the Kadji site for internally displaced persons in the Gounzoureye commune, in the southeast, killing 11 people and injuring one. They set shelters and food stocks ablaze and took away livestock. Since October 2022, humanitarian organizations have been mobilizing to support the internally displaced persons and have thus provided them with food and shelter aid.

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

ATTACK AND KIDNAPPING OF A CIVILIAN IN THE WEST

On 28 November, an attack by armed elements on a mining company’s vehicle on the road between the villages of Nguaguene and Narema, in Nana-Mambere Prefecture, in the west, led to the kidnapping of one civilian gold miner. The other two vehicle passengers reportedly fled into the bush. Armed groups continuously attack civilians, particularly traders and mining artisans, on the Bouar-Niem-Yelewa axis, despite the presence of the Central African Armed Forces in the region.

CHAD

THE GOVERNMENT & HUMANITARIANS CONITNUE TO APPEAL FOR FUNDING

The rain and the river flooding have affected one million people and displaced over 150,000 in the capital N’Djamena. The situation led the government, humanitarian organisations and donors to examine the ongoing response, persistent gaps and challenges. They emphasized the need for an articulated recovery plan and flexible funding to swiftly respond to unprecedented events, worsened by climate change. The 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan, requiring US$70 million, has so far received only $17million, with $8 million in the pipeline, leaving a 60 per cent gap. Combined with funds mobilized by the government, a $30 million gap remains as people’s needs continue to exacerbate due to humanitarian crises.

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

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